EVERYONE Has A Story

At Capturing Legacies, we continue to capture stories. Stories that matter.  Stories that help mankind know itself, and stories that show where we came from as well as all that we have been through.  Every day more and more people are recognizing the importance of recording life stories.

If you have ever wondered how you can give back, and contribute in some way to a worthy cause, please consider our new crowdfunding campaign.   Through this opportunity, Capturing Legacies will record the stories of those people who would otherwise never have the chance to do it themselves.

Alternatively, no matter where you are in the world, you can still contribute through your ability to write and communicate with people.  Take a look at the volunteer opportunities available with Capturing Legacies and do your part to record real history from the people that lived it.

 

E0017 – Three Lives

Join us for Episode 17 of the A Story Not Forgotten Podcast.  If cats have 9 lives then David Schmiekel is likely one third cat.  David shares with us a trilogy of stories from his life where things could have gone much differently and as a result he is a changed man.  Be sure to also check him out on his own podcast called The Gyst!

E0016 – Mysterious Developments

When Azriel Knight bought some old film spools on eBay, he was surprised to find that some of the included film was exposed, so he decided to develop it and found some incredible photos.  This lead Azriel to begin a project called Mysterious Developments, where he did what he could to find old exposed film and locate the original owners of the photos.  He coined the term “Film Archaeology” and has been able to make some people very happy by discovering their lost memories.

Azriel has a popular YouTube Channel which focuses on classic photography gear and techniques

Azriel on Instagram

 

 

 

E0015 – Watch What You Say On Live Television

 

Image credit: radiowest.ca

On episode 15 of the A Story Not Forgotten Podcast Liam interviews Jimmy Hughes, former broadcaster and weatherman in Calgary.  Jimmy shares a hilarious story from when he worked with Ed Whalen and Brenda Finley and Brenda mistakenly used the wrong word during a live news broadcast.

We also have a video version of this episode.

The History of Calgary’s Edworthy Park

Edworthy Park - Photo by Aduro Photography

Edworthy Park – Photo by Aduro Photography

Each month our Member of Parliament for Calgary Signal Hill, Ron Liepert, sends in a newsletter to our community association.  This month they sent a brilliantly written history of one of our beloved Calgary parks.  I asked for permission to post this story on our blog because, not only is it a great read, but it also highlights the fact that the history of places is just as interesting and important as the history of a person.

Posted with permission from author, Patty Wickstrom, edited by Ron Liepert.


As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of confederation, it is important to reflect on our past. In the Calgary Signal Hill riding, there are several areas with historical significance that I intend to highlight in my monthly report to constituents.

Most of us drive by Edworthy Park on a regular basis while others walk the trails often with their trusted four legged friends. We all enjoy the views but few realize the history of the park.

The area was initially one of the nomadic settlements of the Plains Indians who followed the migration of buffalo. The variety of berries and wildlife, such as rabbits and deer, made it sustainable for life. The cliffs and ravines were considered ideal sites for buffalo jumps, from which the Indians used virtually every part of the buffalo for food, shelter, clothing and tools. Evidence remains of the stones from tipi circles on the escarpment and several buffalo bones were uncovered after heavy rains in 1940.

In the 1870’s European settlers began arriving. Among them was Thomas Edworthy, who at the age of 16 arrived in Calgary in 1883 from Devonshire, England. He became a squatter on part of the Cochrane Ranche lease. He used the land to establish a profitable garden market that supplied fresh fruit and vegetables to homesteaders and crews building the railway. There were abundant springs for Edworthy to use for irrigation but because the water was too cold, he built a reservoir out of sandstone to warm the water. The grass that had supported the buffalo was now used for cattle grazing so the Edworthy homestead was built as a ranch and market named Shaganappi Ranch.

In later years, after discovering sandstone on his property, he operated sandstone quarries for the construction of many buildings in Calgary. After a devastating fire destroyed several significant buildings, the city passed an ordinance requiring buildings to be built out of a more permanent material, which lead to Calgary being known as ‘Sandstone City’. Edworthy’s ‘Bow Bank Quarries’ supplied the sandstone for many of the buildings in Calgary that are still standing today such as Fire Hall #2, Central, Balmoral and Victoria Park Schools, and Knox United Church, just to name a few.

In 1894, Tom married Mary Ross, widow of Alexander Ross who was Calgary’s first resident photographer. Ross photographed the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway as it headed west from Manitoba, and many historic scenes, including the signing of Treaty Number Seven. Mary and Tom Edworthy had two sons, Thomas Percival and George (Sr.). Thomas Edworthy died at the age of 48 from typhoid leaving his wife and two sons to operate the businesses and ranch.

In the 1950’s, part of the Edworthy land was sold and became the community of Wildwood. The family sold the remaining land, 169 hectares, to the City of Calgary in 1962 for the development of the park which bears his name.

So the next time you walk through the park look for remnants of the buffalo jump, the ranch and market or the quarry, all part of the history of this beautiful legacy in the middle of our riding.

Isn’t it time you told YOUR story?

E0014 – You don’t know the feeling until you ride, Franny B

Join us for Episode 14 of the A Story Not Forgotten Podcast where you will enjoy an inspiring tribute to a talented man who restored a 1936 Francis-Barnett Blackhawk Motorcycle to showroom condition.  The bike was an inspiration to many and certainly to Keith Park (a.k.a. Stickman Yogi) who wrote a song about the experience.

 

E0014 – Frannie B

On this episode of the A Story Not Forgotten podcast host Liam Rathgeber interviews Keith Park Keith is a motorcycle enthusiast and song writerKeith tells us a story about how he got to meet the owner of a Fully Restored 1936 FrancisBarnett Blackhawk Motorcycle Keith was so moved by the ride he wrote a song about it and dedicated it to the motorcycles owner Everett Schultz who later passed away from cancer Keiths YouTube Channel is httpswwwyoutubecomuserstickmanyogiFor more information on how Capturing Legacies Inc can help you capture your life story please visit httpCapturingLegaciescom

The Mortician’s Assistant

Daisies Copyright © 2016 Aduro Photography, All Rights Reserved

Possibly appropriate for our thirteenth episode of the podcast, but something that might not be appropriate for the squeamish.  Liam interviews Brent Carnes who is a funeral director in Portland Oregon.  Brent has a two-part story about when he first started working as an apprentice and the corpse he had to clean and prepare was partially alive… just not in the way you think it might be.

 

E0013 – The Mortician’s Assistant

Content Warning Not Appropriate for the SqueamishOn this episode of the A Story Not Forgotten podcast host Liam Rathgeber interviews Brent Carnes Brent works as a funeral director and has experienced some pretty gross things in his careerBrent tells us a twopart story of when he first got into the line of work and he unfortunately was not given enough information regarding his first corpse Thankfully the second part of his story warrants a chuckleFor more information on how Capturing Legacies Inc can help you capture your life story please visit httpCapturingLegaciescom

New Offering “Audio Journals”

Many people have kept journals over the years. Sometimes it is those journals that are all that is left behind after the writer passes on.  Capturing Legacies can turn written journals into recorded audio stories.  Did your great grandparent keep a journal?  What would it be like if you could listen to their words. Our experienced voice over talent can take the written words and present them with character and vibrancy like the original author, making them come to life.

Contact us today and get started with your legacy project.